Dutch Warships in the Age of Sail 1600 - 1714James Bender has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, Dutch Warships in the Age of Sail 1600 - 1714: Design, Construction, Careers & Fates. It will be released in the UK on 20 September 2014 and in the US on 15 October 2014.

For most of the seventeenth century the Netherlands constituted the most important maritime power in the world, with by far the largest merchant fleet and a dominance in seaborne trade that other countries feared and envied. Born out of an 80-year struggle against Spain for independence, the Dutch republic relied on naval power to guarantee its freedom, promote its trade and defend its overseas colonies. The Dutch navy was crucial to its survival and success, yet the ships that made up its fleets are among the least studied of any in the age of sail. The reasons for this include a decentralised administration of five separate admiralties, often producing ships of the same name at the same time, the widespread co-opting of merchantmen into naval

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The Ship of the Line: A History in Ship ModelsBrian Lavery has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, The Ship of the Line: A History in Ship Models. It will be released in the US on 15 September 2014 and in the UK on 15 October 2014.

The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich houses the largest collection of scale ship models in the world, many of which are official, contemporary artefacts made by the craftsmen of the navy or the shipbuilders themselves, and ranging from the mid seventeenth century to the present day. As such they represent a three-dimensional archive of unique importance and authority. Treated as historical evidence, they offer more detail than even the best plans, and demonstrate exactly what the ships looked like in a way that even the finest marine painter could not achieve. The Ship of the Line is the second of a new series that takes selections of the best models to tell the story of specific ship types - in this case, the evolution of the ship of the line, the capital ship of its day, and the

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British Expeditions to the South Atlantic 1805-1807John D. Grainger has a new book available for pre-order in Hardcover, British Expeditions to the South Atlantic 1805-1807. It will be released in the US on 19 August 2014 and in the UK on 30 August 2014.

Between 1805 and 1807 the British mounted several expeditions into the South Atlantic aimed at weakening Napoleon's Spanish and Dutch allies. The targets were the Dutch colony on South Africa's Cape of Good Hope, which potentially threatened British shipping routes to India, and the Spanish colonies in the Rio de la Plata basin (now parts of Argentina and Uruguay). In 1805 an army of around 6,000 men was dispatched for the Cape under the highly-respected General David Baird. They were escorted and assisted by a naval squadron under Home Riggs Popham. The Cape surrendered in January 1806. Popham then persuaded Baird to lend him troops for an attack on Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires was taken in July but the paltry British force (around 2,400 men) was then besieged and forced to surrender in

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Give Me a Fast ShipTim McGrath has just released a new book Give Me a Fast Ship: The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea. It is now available worldwide in Hardcover and for Kindle download.

Five ships against hundreds—the fledgling American Navy versus the greatest naval force the world had ever seen...

America in 1775 was on the verge of revolution—or, more likely, disastrous defeat. After the bloodshed at Lexington and Concord, England's King George sent hundreds of ships westward to bottle up American harbors and prey on American shipping. Colonists had no force to defend their coastline and waterways until John Adams of Massachusetts proposed a bold solution: The Continental Congress should raise a navy.

The idea was mad. The Royal Navy was the mightiest floating arsenal in history, with a seemingly endless supply of vessels. More than a hundred of these were massive "ships of the line," bristling with up to a hundred high-powered cannon that could level a city. The British were

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Attack of the HMS Nimrod: Wareham and the War of 1812J. North Conway & Jesse Dubuc recently released a new book about the Attack of the HMS Nimrod: Wareham and the War of 1812. It is now available worldwide in Paperback and for Kindle download.

On the morning of June 13, 1814, the British warship HMS Nimrod attacked the town of Wareham, Massachusetts. As a center for shipbuilding and iron, Wareham was a perfect target for the British fleet. When the lead barge deceptively appeared with a white flag at its bow, Wareham never suspected anything but a truce and was ill prepared for the attack. A raiding party with six barges and two hundred men burned the town's cotton mill, destroyed its vessels and took its citizens as hostages. When Nimrod tried to flee the shores, it ran aground and had to throw its cannons and guns overboard in order to lighten its load and sail away. Wareham was left smoldering in its wake. Follow authors J. North Conway and Jesse Dubuc as they trace the attack from the initial spotting of the British fleet to the

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